Blog & News

Thu 29 October 2015

Category: Cover Photos

The Quiraing on the Isle of Skye, Scotland (Photo: Paul Mitchell) The Quiraing, on the northern end of the Isle of Skye, consists of Jurassic sediments overlain by thick lava flows. The rocks dip gently westwards, creating gently rising slopes from west to east. Landslides were formed due to the pressure of the overlying lava flows weighing down on the weaker Jurassic rocks. The Jurassic rocks sheared along N-S faults and huge lava blocks slide seawards along a rotational glide plane.

The Quiraing on the Isle of Skye, Scotland (Photo: Paul Mitchell)
The Quiraing, on the northern end of the Isle of Skye, consists of Jurassic sediments overlain by thick lava flows. The rocks dip gently westwards, creating gently rising slopes from west to east. Landslides were formed due to the pressure of the overlying lava flows weighing down on the weaker Jurassic rocks. The Jurassic rocks sheared along N-S faults and huge lava blocks slide seawards along a rotational glide plane.

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